Health By Moritz Waldstein — Date 08.16.2016

We’re slightly dehydrated, all the time

Even in its mildest forms dehydration takes a toll. Right now, your body would probably like some water.

A recent study in the US found that most kids and teenagers are constantly mildly dehydrated. The Harvard scientists who conducted the survey found that nearly 25 percent of the broad cross-section of children from 6 to 19 years of age actually don’t drink any water as part of their fluid intake. In fact, children were not drinking much at all: More than half of more than 4000 students who participated in the study between 2009 and 2012 were at least slightly dehydrated.

Though not necessarily a health risk, it is proven that mild dehydration does take a toll on the body and mind in multiple ways: It makes us tired and floppy, impairs our ability to concentrate, affects our mood, can cause headaches, and—quite interestingly—increases our perception of task difficulty.

In short: Mild dehydration reduces our ability to perform to our full potential.

The Harvard study suggests that the habit of not drinking enough is formed early in our lives. So let’s get clear about how sufficient hydration benefits us.

Approximately 60% of our bodymass is water. Therefore it is essential for our body to function properly.

1. Our metabolism runs on water

It circulates our blood, supports our organ’s functions and thus cleans the body of toxins.

2. So, does our body temperature

Water regulates our body temperature, thus allowing us to function in different climates.

3. Water aids digestion


Drinking a lot of water is good for digestion: it dissolves fats, binds with fibers and facilitates the transport through our system.

4. Drinking water improves exercise


When exercising, good hydration can prevent unpleasant repercussions by protecting our joints from the chance of injury and pain.

5. Water is regenerative

Water supports our body’s regeneration, therefore staying hydrated keeps our skin healthy and fresh.

So how much water do we really need?

Since we are all different from each other, there is no exact rule, but researchers recommend 2.2 liters of fluid intake per day for women and 3 liters for men. Still, how much water you personally need to feel your best is dependent on many more factors like build, amount of exercise, what you eat, if it is hot outside, etcetera. One safe indicator for dehydration is the color of your urine. If you are doing fine, you should be peeing in pale straw yellow, as you can learn from multiple color charts.

Science aside: The smartest and safest way to keep yourself hydrated might just be to simply listen to your body and drink water as soon as you get thirsty. We’ve designed mitte to learn your usage patterns so that your daily water supply is always available at the push of a button.

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